New babies at Wildlife Ranch

Five cheetah cubs, a baby brown-lemur, Egyptian geese and a baby flying fox are the summer babies recently born at the Cango Wildlife Ranch in Oudtshoorn. The cheetah cubs – two female and three male – were born on 20 October to cheetah-mom Pippa and dad Parker. The females were named Thandi (loving one) and Topaz (jewel) and the males T’Challa (the hero of the film Black Panther), Troy (a famous foot soldier) and Thane (warrior). More about the Cango Wildlife Ranch’s babies on page 3. Photo supplied

A curious baby brown lemur clinging to its mother at the Cango Wildlife Ranch.  Photo  supplied

SUMMER has brought new life with it to the Cango Wildlife Ranch in Oudtshoorn with five cheetah cubs, a baby brown lemur, Egyptian geese and a baby flying fox.

The cheetah cubs were born on 20 October at the Jill Bryden Cheetah Reserve in Oudtshoorn to cheetah-mom, Pippa, and dad, Parker.

Craig Gouws, Assistant Zoological Manager , says the two female and three male cubs are doing well. “I saw their mom born to the Cango family, so it’s a huge privilege seeing her babies healthy, happy and settling in well. They all have big personalities and are uncannily suited to their unique names.”

Name-finding is a special time for the staff of the Cango Wildlife Ranch, with everyone contributing and names eventually chosen to suit every cub’s personality.

The females were named Thandi (loving one) and Topaz (jewel). The males were named T’Chal-la (the hero of the film Black Panther), Troy (a famous foot soldier) and Thane (warrior). A sole cub born a month prior to the five cubs, Thor, is currently being introduced to the five siblings.

According to Mari-Lize Warrington, marketing manager at the Cango Wildlife Ranch, there are only less than 7100 cheetahs left in the wild.

“With that an international self-sustaining cheetah population in professional and ethical human care is becoming even more important. Since 1986 the Cango Wildlife Ranch has been pioneers in successful cheetah breeding with a focus on breeding to increase the in-situ populace. In layman’s terms, this means we hope to help facilitate the birth of healthy, happy and genetically diverse cheetahs who could one day, should they go extinct in the wild, offer a cheetah-species to rectify and assist the collapsed genetic pool.”

The first section of the guided tour leads visitors into the Valley of Ancients, where those who look closely enough, will be able to spot a baby holding onto his mom for safe-keeping. At Cheetahland close-by the brown lemur baby can be observed.
“Scientists estimate that we are the last generation who can stop the mass-extinction our planet is facing. Our new family members are of immeasurable value to every generation who visits us to learn more about them,” Warrington said.

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